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Therapists are full of shit

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    Therapists are full of shit

    Every year, colleges graduate more and more licensed therapists and psychiatrists. With an overabundance of therapists, they need to work to find a way to justify their professional existence. So they diagnose more and more people with make-believe problems and disorders. While there are real people with real mental health problems out there, there simply aren't enough real ones around to keep the money rolling in for the therapy industry.

    When a therapist tells a client they have a diagnosis like ADHD, bipolar, depression, generalized anxiety, or anger problems. This can plant a seed in the mind of the client and potentially make the client actually believe these problems are truly there even if they are not. The patient believes they have problems via the placebo effect, and develop long term insecurities that keep them coming back to the therapist's office. Therapists and psychiatrists get kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies to prescribe such psychotropic drugs to fight these supposed problems. Most of the time the patient doesn't even need these drugs to solve whatever 1st world problem or insecurity they are experiencing. These drugs always bring on a slew of negative side effects that harm the client another way. All these therapists and doctors are from the same school of thought; their textbooks are bankrolled by big pharma as well. Therapists are not prophets. Many of them have problems similar to yours, so why look to them as a wiser and higher being than yourself? Some are likely cheating on their spouses and doing narcotics on the weekend.

    I hate seeing good people who are successful in their professional and family life, constantly fall victim to these mental health scams. My friend who is a very successful designer who's far more talented than I, he told me he was diagnosed with a whole bunch of weird things, including bipolar disorder. I've known this guy for 11 years, and he has far more control over his life than most people with true mental disorders. I'm actually jealous how much better success this guy has had, and he just accepts these bullshit labels thrown at him by a therapist who knew him for less than an 2 appointments worth of time. Another example is my brother, started taking anti-depressants because his job has been stressing him out much more lately. I tell him he doesn't need the pills, and he ought to change his dietary and exercise habits to combat the negative emotions. 66% of people on anti-depressants aren't even clinically or endogenously depressed either!

    For much of my youth, I was a metal slave to the therapy industry. My doctors and therapists told me I wouldn't be able to function in society without stimulants and anti-depressants. I was told my shortfalls were because of my ADHD, and without the pills, I'd never succeed. I broke the shackles when I decided to detox from these legal drugs they pushed upon me, and underwent a mindset shift. I proved those fuckers wrong. I adopted a new mindset to disbelieve that my ADHD and depression were all fake and artificial. If I couldn't pay attention to a lecture, it was because the teacher or the subject matter was boring. If I was feeling sad, it was because of a situation, not because of a chronic mental depression. These therapists and doctors lied. Since giving up those pills, I'm less jittery, I don't stutter in my speech, I am more relaxed in social scenes, and I no longer have painful head aches. My life has improved tremendously since.

    I know I pissed off a LOT of you a couple years ago when I said "Depression isn't real." The reason I made that old thread back at Hip was when I had an epiphany to overcome a very toxic mindset. Defying the existence of depression is a good mindset to adopt if you wanna fight it. Unless you've got a real clinical diagnosis, your depression is most likely a situational sadness that you eventually get over. You can overcome depression with a mindset shift, physical exercise, and possibly a better diet. You don't need a fucking therapist. You don't need psychotropic drugs. A therapist's business model relies on you coming in once a week to talk about all your insecurities and everything bad that's ever happened to you for an hour or so.

    Sure it might feel good to blow off some steam to vent all your problems to someone who is getting paid to listen to you bitch and complain. But are you really getting anything accomplished just by chit chatting? Answer is NO. The more you sit around and talk about all the problems and negative life experiences, the more it mentally destroys you in the long run. You're wasting lots of money too, because therapists are expensive. If you want to overcome a problem, you take action. Action always wins. Therapy is not action, it's a time waster at best, and an insecurity builder at worst.

    Unless you find yourself a very specialized life coach who is trained and experienced to helping you overcome a bad lifestyle habit or a personality flaw, you are better off not seeking a general therapist or doctor of psychiatry; they are all cut from the same cloth. Despite the dirt I fling at doctors and therapists, I am OK with life coaches. Life coaches have different specialties who take on a client's problem from a holistic approach, rather than push pills. The last life coach I sought after was a bestselling author. I wouldn't hire a life coach who has no success or status symbols to show for it.

    #2
    Lolz, this site wont even let me list all the ailments in the DSM -5 in one post, as 86,000 characters are required, and 10,000 is the limit

    Its a long, pretty ridiculous list, which can be viewed here: https://thriveworks.com/blog/every-dsm-5-diagnosis/

    Comment


      #3
      Some highlights


      301.7 F60.2 Antisocial personality disorder
      293.84 F06.4 Anxiety disorder due to another medical condition
      Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
      314.01 F90.2 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Combined presentation
      314.01 F90.1 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Predominantly hyperactive/impulsive presentation
      314.00 F90.0 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Predominantly inattentive presentation
      299.00 F84.0 Autism spectrum disorder
      347.00 G47.419 Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy
      347.00 G47.419 Autosomal dominant narcolepsy, obesity, and type 2 diabetes
      301.82 F60.6 Avoidant personality disorder
      307.59 F50.8 Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder
      307.51 F50.8 Binge-eating disorder
      293.83 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition
      F06.33 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With manic features
      F06.33 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With manic- or hypomanic-like episodes
      F06.34 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With mixed features
      Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed
      296.56 F31.76 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, In full remission
      296.55 F31.75 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, In partial remission
      296.51 F31.31 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Mild
      296.52 F31.32 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Moderate
      296.53 F31.4 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Severe
      296.50 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Unspecified
      296.54 F31.5 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, With psychotic features
      296.40 F31.0 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic
      296.46 F31.74 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, In full remission
      296.45 F31.73 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, In partial remission
      296.40 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, Unspecified
      Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic
      296.46 F31.74 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, In full remission
      296.45 F31.73 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, In partial remission
      296.41 F31.11 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Mild
      296.42 F31.12 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Moderate
      296.43 F31.13 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Severe
      296.40 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Unspecified
      296.44 F31.2 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, With psychotic features
      296.7 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode unspecified
      296.89 F31.81 Bipolar II disorder
      300.7 F45.22 Body dysmorphic disorder
      V62.89 R41.83 Borderline intellectual functioning
      301.83 F60.3 Borderline personality disorder
      298.8 F23 Brief psychotic disorder
      307.51 F50.2 Bulimia nervosa
      305.90 F15.929 Caffeine intoxication
      292.0 F15.93 Caffeine withdrawal
      292.89 Caffeine-induced anxiety disorder

      Comment


      • Vanilla Gorilla
        Vanilla Gorilla commented
        Editing a comment
        You'll note Aspergers isnt in there anymore, so if any of you want to pretend to have aspergers now, its now called Pervasive Development disorder Not otherwise specified. i.e you are autistic but it just didnt affect your speech/language

      #4
      Schizoaffective disorder
      295.70 F25.0 Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar type
      295.70 F25.1 Schizoaffective disorder, Depressive type
      301.20 F60.1 Schizoid personality disorder
      295.90 F20.9 Schizophrenia
      295.40 F20.81 Schizophreniform disorder

      Comment


        #5
        The Rapist...

        Comment


          #6
          The Child Molester...

          Comment


            #7
            The Necrophiliac...


            (Jeffery Dahmer)

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by Vanilla Gorilla View Post
              Some highlights


              301.7 F60.2 Antisocial personality disorder
              293.84 F06.4 Anxiety disorder due to another medical condition
              Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
              314.01 F90.2 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Combined presentation
              314.01 F90.1 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Predominantly hyperactive/impulsive presentation
              314.00 F90.0 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Predominantly inattentive presentation
              299.00 F84.0 Autism spectrum disorder
              347.00 G47.419 Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy
              347.00 G47.419 Autosomal dominant narcolepsy, obesity, and type 2 diabetes
              301.82 F60.6 Avoidant personality disorder
              307.59 F50.8 Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder
              307.51 F50.8 Binge-eating disorder
              293.83 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition
              F06.33 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With manic features
              F06.33 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With manic- or hypomanic-like episodes
              F06.34 Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition, With mixed features
              Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed
              296.56 F31.76 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, In full remission
              296.55 F31.75 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, In partial remission
              296.51 F31.31 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Mild
              296.52 F31.32 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Moderate
              296.53 F31.4 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Severe
              296.50 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, Unspecified
              296.54 F31.5 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode depressed, With psychotic features
              296.40 F31.0 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic
              296.46 F31.74 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, In full remission
              296.45 F31.73 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, In partial remission
              296.40 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode hypomanic, Unspecified
              Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic
              296.46 F31.74 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, In full remission
              296.45 F31.73 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, In partial remission
              296.41 F31.11 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Mild
              296.42 F31.12 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Moderate
              296.43 F31.13 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Severe
              296.40 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, Unspecified
              296.44 F31.2 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode manic, With psychotic features
              296.7 F31.9 Bipolar I disorder, Current or most recent episode unspecified
              296.89 F31.81 Bipolar II disorder
              300.7 F45.22 Body dysmorphic disorder
              V62.89 R41.83 Borderline intellectual functioning
              301.83 F60.3 Borderline personality disorder
              298.8 F23 Brief psychotic disorder
              307.51 F50.2 Bulimia nervosa
              305.90 F15.929 Caffeine intoxication
              292.0 F15.93 Caffeine withdrawal
              292.89 Caffeine-induced anxiety disorder
              caffeine withdrawal: aka being tired.

              caffeine intoxication: aka diarrhea.

              Comment


                #9
                Not all therapists are full of shit..

                The one I ended up going to a few years ago, actually was good. I went to several, wasn't impressed.

                Big difference between a good one, and an average one.

                Comment


                  #10
                  I agree with both the OP and Amerijuanican

                  there is definitely some truth to what 6 is saying, and I am not in favour of medication for anxiety, depression, etc.
                  So much more can be dealt with by improving diet, fitness, sleeping, social media use and such, than some people accept. They say "oh if it were that easy..." and I never see where "easy" came into it. No, it isn't always easy. It takes (sometimes uncomfortable) work.

                  But equally, like Juanican says, not all therapists are full of shit. Lots of them genuinely want to help people with the aforementioned work, help guide people through it, and some people need that authority figure to tell them this is a worthwhile effort to make. Some people need help figuring things out, and someone to listen to them. There is no shame in that.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    I think therapists are merely useful tools in a journey to self awareness, and maybe this is why therapy has no value for some individuals - because they aren't aware that self awareness is the real goal and don't know how to utilize their therapist for that purpose.

                    I'm not in therapy and have never really been in therapy save for 5 sessions I did last year....and that was true for me at the time. I didn't really know what I was trying to achieve in therapy and so I didn't get much out of it. But since that point I have been on a mission of self awareness and I've been utilizing a lot of psychology theory and watching a lot of videos put out on youtube by therapists lol....basically self guided therapy sans the uncomfortable hour of talking about yourself once a week, which is great lol

                    and I've stumbled into some really valuable insights because I know exactly what I want to achieve with this and the type of person i'm attempting to guide myself into being. So I think I could probably get more out of therapy now.

                    It isn't totally neccessarily though. Making real fundamental change to ones' self is just reprogramming our existing subconscious programming, which can be done in a number of ways. A change in mindset can do wonders. But I still think you have to be willing to do the deep dive, to figure out why you are the way you are so you can learn to recognize and reprogram your subconscious triggers and stop living out the same behavioral patterns over and over again. It isn't as simple as just focusing on the positive. There are lessons to be learned in one's cumulative painful experiences.

                    I think in your depression thread on HF, 6, I talked about the first bout of major depression I went through and how I didn't take medication and it took me a long time to pull myself out of it. I went through another bout of depression last year, obviously situational lol. But I was doing everything right. Good diet, daily exercise, daily meditation, a creative outlet...it didn't really matter what I did, I just felt dead and empty all the time. I stopped enjoying music, which was disturbing as fuuuck lol. Everything irritated me. Obvious chemical imbalance in brain was obvious. It was physical, it wasn't just in my head. I mean, the brain *is* physical so its weird when we talk about mental health as if it is detached from the physical in some way.
                    Anyways So I took anti depressants because I didn't want to be like that for 3 years again. Within 3 months I was feeling a lot better so I stopped taking medication. I think the biggest issue with medication is they're meant to be a short term crutch while you do all the hard work to get to a mentally healthy place, but instead meds are often treated as a long term solution.

                    A couple of things that really bothered me about my experience with anti depressants - it weirded me out how easily I was able to get them, for one. Everything was telehealth then, so I just filled out a questionaire, talked to the psychiatrist on the phone, and he was like yep sounds like you've been struggling, here is a script. and then the next month I told him I was starting to feel a little better and the meds were working and he offered to up my dose...which seemed really weird since I was responding well to the low dose I was on. There is a lot of criticism to be made of psychiatrists and psychiatric drugs in general, but it's a nuanced topic, it isn't black and white. Medication and therapy can also help people out of black holes and help them get back to their center.

                    I'm rambling. I probably have more to say on this subject but i'll stop there lol

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Oh one more thing actually, speaking of mindset, I really reframed how I look at depression last year. I see it as a thing of value now. All bad experiences have value and a learning experience to offer us. Depression is an opportunity to slow down and re-examine the life you're living and determine the life you actually want to live.
                      I assume a good therapist can assist in this process if one's mind isn't clear enough to go about it on their own
                      Last edited by Meliai; 06-29-2021, 02:16 PM.

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Another thing is that today, with the internet what it is, there are loads of people making insta-reels and tiktoks and etc. about mental health stuff. The best ones are by people who have actually trained or learned deeply about psychology. The thing here is that while they might in part be advertising themselves, they are putting very helpful ideas out there for free.

                        I have learned several things from internet personalities that have been helpful to me, and it's my choice whether I support those people financially or not. They have no motivation to keep me needing help; if anything, the opposite. They want to make a positive enough impact that people choose to support them.

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Originally posted by Amerijuanican View Post
                          Not all therapists are full of shit..

                          The one I ended up going to a few years ago, actually was good. I went to several, wasn't impressed.

                          Big difference between a good one, and an average one.
                          Yeah, details matter. A general statement as in the thread title means little.
                          Unfortunatly it is part luck to end up with a good one I guess, and if a person first have to go through 3 bad ones (or 3 unsuccessful ones, also possible: they mean well, just can't diagnose or help a case properly for whatever reason) its understandable they conclude such a thing..
                          Some are full of shit, some are very helpful, a lot want to be helpful but aren't. It sucks, but diagnosing or helping an invisible ailment often isn't easy

                          Comment


                            #15
                            I fancy myself an accredited psychologist.

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