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We lost our ability to sing

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    We lost our ability to sing

    Back before recorded music was invented, nobody had the luxury to play music from someone else on a whim like we do today. No headphones, radios, speakers. If they wanted to hear music, they had to sing themselves.

    Lots of proven documentation of this. Singing was something people did at parties and at the workplace. Railroad and farm workers sang as they worked. This was how they got through a tedious day of repetitive labor. Nowadays you see farm and factory workers all wearing ear buds. At parties without a live band playing, the partygoers used to sing.

    My great grandparents were alive in the 1800s. Although I never met them, my parents said they remembered how good they could sing. I attribute this to living in an era before recorded music and the radio.


    #2
    I am definitely for more group singing. I was thinking about it when we were in that chapel. Those places are designed to have good acoustics. Singing together like whales or howling wolves.. unites us and is one of the kinds of platonic bonding tools we have.

    It got all confused with the Christian God thing but a lot of the things that are part of religious worship would be great as part of a practise where we praise the divinity in ourselves and each other. Dancing, singing, reading together, discussion, story telling, meditation..

    I'm not very confident in my singing. I'd love to do it more with other people.

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      #3
      You're right. All with our own earbuds in. The downfall of society is mostly due to separation.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Jessica View Post
        I am definitely for more group singing. I was thinking about it when we were in that chapel. Those places are designed to have good acoustics. Singing together like whales or howling wolves.. unites us and is one of the kinds of platonic bonding tools we have.

        It got all confused with the Christian God thing but a lot of the things that are part of religious worship would be great as part of a practise where we praise the divinity in ourselves and each other. Dancing, singing, reading together, discussion, story telling, meditation..

        I'm not very confident in my singing. I'd love to do it more with other people.
        When enough people sing together in a room with good acoustics, like that chapel, it can sound quite godlike. It helps when enough talented singer drown out the voices of the ones who suck at singing. I guess this is why church is one of the few places left where most people feel comfortable singing while sober.

        We should sing more often.

        It’d be so whimsical if people broke out into song in real life on a daily basis. Just like they do in movie musicals and Broadway plays

        Comment


          #5
          Ah see, the chapel shape and churches and cathedrals are actually designed on purpose to harness acoustic properties.

          The sound travels up the steeple like a vortex, the energy of sound literally gets stronger and faster and more energetic as it travels faster up the steeple as it narrows off.

          The idea is if you get enough people chanting and singing, perhaps there's enough energy created to actually reach god way up there, through that very narrow corrodore of a vortex at the tip of a steeple.

          In fact many steeple architecture from the ancient world was created for this purpose.

          Ever wonder why priests or even witches wear pointed hats? It connects them to higher beings.

          There's an idea about ancient technology that revolves around this exact principal. That if you could produce enough energy into one singular point, that energy may be used to cut, blow, move, lift etc. Which is all scientifically valid and proven to be true with sound frequency.

          In Sumeria the Anunnaki were portrayed by holding cones and a box in the other hand when they worked.

          Why the cone, why the box? Were they using this cone to build, manufacture?

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          The Sumerians did have quite the taste for classical music, which no doubt, was a heavy influence forged from their ideology and religion.

          I always liked to think they were holding a music box, the tell tale sign of advanced technology is actually on their wrists, which looks like a watch but it's not, it's actually a very crucial symbol in Sumerian referring to technology.

          So to me the music box creates energy within the cone and it spirals throughout the cone until it reaches its vortex point. Then BOOM! All a sudden we're lifting giant blocks of rock into a platform.


          ​​​​
          Last edited by Irminsul; 11-25-2021, 04:23 AM.

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          • 6-eyed
            6-eyed commented
            Editing a comment
            Fascinating!

          #6
          I was walking towards this girl yesterday, and she towards me, and as she passed she busted into song. I don't know how I was supposed to feel about it.

          Comment


            #7
            So basically we don't sing cult-like chants to reinforce our superstitions or call-and-response to alleviate the toll of grueling work conditions anymore? Good Riddance

            Gimme people singing in unison at a concert or festival to glorify the music itself or our coveted karaoke for leisure. I'm sure there are some choirs one can see/join if they need the singing to be in harmony.

            Comment


              #8
              Fun fact, the vagus nerve is closely related to how emotional trauma is stored physically in the body. A lot of trauma therapy is currently centered around stimulating the vagus nerve.

              The vagus nerve also controls your vocal cords and when you sing you're essentially giving your vagus nerve a little massage. Which is why singing can be so soothing and therapeutic.

              Comment


                #9
                Originally posted by 6-eyed View Post

                It’d be so whimsical if people broke out into song in real life on a daily basis. Just like they do in movie musicals and Broadway plays
                God I can't tell you how bad I wish life was like this. Society is way too reserved when it comes to self expression

                Comment


                • Din Djarin
                  Din Djarin commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You obviously have not heard me sing :P

                #10
                Originally posted by 6-eyed View Post
                Back before recorded music was invented, nobody had the luxury to play music from someone else on a whim like we do today. No headphones, radios, speakers. If they wanted to hear music, they had to sing themselves.

                Lots of proven documentation of this. Singing was something people did at parties and at the workplace. Railroad and farm workers sang as they worked. This was how they got through a tedious day of repetitive labor. Nowadays you see farm and factory workers all wearing ear buds. At parties without a live band playing, the partygoers used to sing.

                My great grandparents were alive in the 1800s. Although I never met them, my parents said they remembered how good they could sing. I attribute this to living in an era before recorded music and the radio.
                Injuns are still better off with our modern way of life though

                Comment


                  #11
                  Just on the cone tool theory, here are the cone tools found in south Africa. They are researched to be hundreds of thousands of years old and are from a rock called ring rock.

                  If anyone doubted the theory that sound frequency has anything to do with the cone shape rock, understand that these tools ring like a bell.

                  Are these the same tools the Anunnaki were depicted to be using in those pictures? As you can see, the cones weren't a physical tool to use, they weren't for bashing, ringrock isn't hard for hitting like a hammer. But ringrock has extreme harmonic properties and everything to do with sound.

                  More fascination.

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                  Last edited by Irminsul; 11-25-2021, 06:53 PM.

                  Comment


                    #12
                    Just an FYI I am going to go places with this and make it subject to the subject at hand. not the cones or Anunnaki, but ancient music in general.

                    I just need to research and make sure I have it all correct in my head.

                    I'm also struggling to find photographs of what I will be talking about. So I'm just researching something but I think y'all will find it interesting and has everything to do about singing and music in the ancient world and what it might have meant.

                    Comment


                      #13
                      One of the first instances of song in ancient civilisation came from the indigenous tribes of Australia. Singing is a part of their creation stories.

                      Earth at one point during its formation didn't look like it does today so the Aboriginal creation tale talks about 3 star travelling gods that sang 3 songs into the earth, and the earth pirched with Form and Glory, akin to Christian revelations.

                      This next Video depicts what certain sound frequencies actually look like as a physical form.
                      You'll notice the geometric shapes and patterns change as the frequency also changes.

                      https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...5ltmg&usqp=CAU

                      Now doesn't this look eerily similar to the millions of stone circle ruins littering the landscape of south Africa?

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                      The formations of rocks span a total of approximately 500,000 square kilometres of the South African landscape. Originally they were said to be ancient dwellings and the colonial dwellings, but you'll see that, although in ruins, the circles don't actually have entrances or exits.

                      So what was their purpose?

                      Well scientists are now hard at work learning that the earth sings with its own frequencies and what we are most likely looking at with the stone circles of south Africa, are the actual physical representation of the frequency emitted at that exact point on earth, at least when they were built at an estimated 300,000 to 500,000 years ago.

                      I think that's really cool and it shows just how important sound really was in the ancient days, that song didn't just unify a culture or civilisation, but it actually connects to everything on earth.

                      And not just earth, every planet, every orbital object in the universe hums and sings to its own frequency. The universe is just a big juke box, is how I like to think of it.

                      When scientists launched a rocket at the moon, they were unexpectedly surprised at what followed. The moon rang like a bell for hours.
                      Last edited by Irminsul; 11-25-2021, 10:11 PM.

                      Comment


                        #14
                        A bit of interesting history that ties to music theory. The 7 Modes that are commonly associated with Modern Western Music (Ionian, Dorian, Phyrigian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian) are named after tribes in Ancient Greece or societies that are depicted in their mythology.

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                          #15
                          My next article is a little harder to put together as I am finding it difficult to find photos of what I'm talking about. I originally learned about this theory in a seminar so I am not sure where the information actually came from.

                          Earlier in this thread was discussed group singing which got me thinking about choirs in church Etc which got me thinking about ancient architecture and how they are used to amplify sound.

                          I discussed the church steeple, but I want to start talking about ancient amphitheatres.

                          If anyone has seen the migrations to Mecca, you'll see them all circling and ohmm'ing around a golden rock in the centre of Mecca and anyone that's ever been will describe the euphoria of being there.

                          The idea is the more people traversing the same direction and omitting the frequency produces an energy that can be physically felt and it's sort of an enlightenment to those involved. Enlightenment by sound frequency.

                          Sound frequency does lead to enlightenment, I'm sure everyone reading this has felt an emotional moment while listening to music, I know that certain parts in songs can fill me with adrenaline or sorrow, excitement and depression all seem to effect me by the different sounds I hear or at least how my ears and brain perceive those sounds and frequencies.

                          So what about the amphitheatre. As I said I'm actually struggling to find the right pictures to hold as evidence so I'm going to have to try and explain it.

                          Amphitheatres were common in the ancient work around significant cities. They are found world wide, all quite commonly either half circle/oval to full circles and oval shaped arenas.

                          I believe the architectural design speaks volumes of what the purpose was and I believe the purpose was very similar to that of Mecca, that if enough people would sing, chant and create energy then it would reverb around the amphitheatre creating its own source of energy.

                          Most amphitheatres were attached to the city either directly in the centre as a heart, or on the outskirts but always connected to the city by walls.

                          This is hard to imagine as over time they have been subjected to ruin, it's hard to obtain a clear picture until we start to photograph and look at the layouts from the sky.

                          The best examples are of Roman and Greek architecture because a lot of the columns don't actually make sense. If we look at this ancient Roman Amphitheatre just have a good look at the architecture used.

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                          We see the same columns throughout Roman and Greek architecture which are beautiful to look at but there's been recent study into the layouts of ancient cities and just how familiar they really are to an electronic circuit board.

                          This next example illustrates a modern circuit board in the formation of an ancient South American city.

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                          If we were to look at ancient cities in this way, then perhaps, could it be possible that the actual energy to drive these power plant cities was and is the actual amphitheatre itself? Harnessing the energy from hoards of people in attendance?

                          It is interesting to think about, that the ancient folk did in fact connect their cities like this and much like those stone circles of south Africa, it's just hard to depict today because they're in ruins but even Moden interpretations of these cities are illustrated as a huge network of walls and columns which all align to these amphitheatres, or, as I like to call them, ancient power plants.

                          This sort of brings back the community of music and singing discussed earlier, that it was extremely important to our ancestors, singing and music in general have always meant a lot to us, but perhaps not generally for the reason we initially think about.

                          Last edited by Irminsul; 11-26-2021, 01:36 AM.

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